The Omlet Blog Category Archives: Summer

Cool cats – how to beat the heat with your feline

Cat and owner interacting - cat using Omlet Freestyle Outdoor Cat Tree in Omlet Catio

Did you know that cats originated from the desert regions? That’s right – it’s been discovered that our cats’ ancestors date back over 10,000 years ago to areas around the deserts of the Middle East. So that should mean they can handle really hot temperatures, right? Wrong! House cats today have been domesticated for centuries and, because of that, they no longer have the ability to handle such high temperatures. So what can you do to help your cat over summer? Grab some cold water for you and your cat and keep reading to find out how to beat the heat with your feline.

Causes of overheating in cats

The number one reason most cats get overheated is because they cannot regulate their internal body temperature. Unlike humans who can perspire to release some of the high temperatures, cats don’t have sweat glands. As a result, their bodies cannot cool down naturally so they are more susceptible to heat. 

Fortunately, the majority of house cats are indoor animals, only exploring the outside when in safe and secured cat enclosures. But that doesn’t mean you should ignore the possibility of heat exhaustion with your cat. The best rule to follow is, if it’s too hot for you outside, it’s too hot for your cat.

3 signs your cat is overheated

How hot is too hot? While there’s not an exact temperature at which cats can no longer tolerate the heat, there are – thankfully – many initial signs you can look for that indicate your cat may be too hot. Here is a list of warning signs to be aware of:

1. Lethargy

One of the most common indicators that a cat is too hot is a slow down in their energy and movement. In an effort to reduce heat, cats will become lethargic to try and prevent further increase in body heat. Since you know your cat best, be aware of their energy specifically in higher temp months. If they slow down suddenly, it’s time to cool off quickly.

2. Panting

Unlike dogs, it is not normal for cats to pant. The only way a cat can minimally release heat is through the pads of their paws and excessive panting. So if your cat’s paws feel sweaty to the touch and their tongues are out panting, then they’re too hot.

3. Vomiting

In severe cases of heat exhaustion, your cat may start to suddenly vomit and their body will likely tremble. If you start to notice any of these signs you need to seek medical attention from your vet immediately. 

How to cool down your kitty

The lifestyle of a cat is much different from a dog. While dogs are in and out all day to pee, play and lay, cats can do all of that from the comfort of the inside of your home. But that doesn’t mean cats are exempt from getting overheated. What if the A/C kicks the bucket on a hot summer day? Or what if your cat likes to lounge on the window sill that suddenly gets too hot in the summer sun? It’s still possible for your cat to get too hot while indoors. Here are 4 tips on how you can cool them down when they get too hot:

1. Keep the indoor temperature comfortable

Over the last few years, many of us have been working more from home, which means indoor temps are likely enjoyable for all. However, as many transition back to a work environment outside the house, it’s important to remember that your cats still need those comfortable A/C settings – especially in hotter months. So, just because you may not be home all day, your cat might be and keeping the house cool will ensure they are too. Also, ensure to keep curtains and blinds closed to keep out hot sunlight.

Outdoor setups can also be made cool and comfortable. Omlet’s Catios offer a range of cat weather protection covers, which offer shade to keep sunlight out and kitties, cool. Plus, fresh air is incredibly beneficial to our feline friends by helping to relieve stress and allowing them to investigate the outside world. 

2. Water, water, water!

Whether you are gone from home 8 hours a day, or just 80 minutes, your cat needs access to fresh water all the time. During the hotter months, try and keep multiple cat water bowls around the house so your kitty can stay super hydrated. And if you have a cat that doesn’t get stressed by being IN the water, then giving them a cool bath when it’s hot outside will help to keep kitty cool too.

3. Lots of brushing

Good hygiene is always important for our cats, and regular brushing is part of that process. In the summer months, grooming your cat can be even more beneficial as it helps to eliminate any extra hair that could be keeping your cat too warm. So when the temperature outside starts to rise, increase the frequency of grooming sessions.

4. Get a cooling mat

One of the best investments you can make for your cat during hot summer months is to buy them a cooling mat. Whether placed on the floor or on their bed, a cooling mat is a great way to keep your kitty cool all summer long. The Omlet Cooling Mat is a great option as it doesn’t require electricity or refrigeration to work – just the body heat from your cat will activate the cooling effects. You can rest assured that your cat will rest comfortably on one of these mats.

Which cats are more susceptible to heat?

Too much heat isn’t good for any cat, but there are certain breeds or conditions that are more susceptible to higher temperatures. So while you should be vigilant to keep your cat comfortably cool in summer, here are a few cats to be extra vigilant around.

  • Exotic Shorthair: These easygoing and affectionate cats make wonderful indoor companions. They love a good snuggle and are super easy to please. But they also have very short noses, making them much more vulnerable to heat and high temperatures. So best to keep these cats where they love to be on hot summer days – inside and cooled.
  • Persians: This breed gives new meaning to the phrase, “chilled out”. If given the chance to play about or lay around, they’ll likely choose the latter. Persians are very affectionate cats that are also very hairy. And it’s their long hair, coupled with their lack of desired exercise that makes them much more prone to issues with higher temperatures. So if you have a Persian, let them do what they do best in the summer months – chill out!
  • Seniors and kittens: These two age groups are important to watch when it gets hotter outside because of how their bodies react to higher temperatures. With kittens, their bodies are still growing so their ability to regulate internal body temperatures is not as robust as an adult cat. Likewise, senior cats can often experience a weaker immune system with age, making them susceptible to high heat as well.
  • Medical conditions: If your feline friend has any type of breathing problem, such as asthma or bronchitis, they’re more likely to have problems with hot temperatures. Always check with your veterinarian if your cat has a specific medical condition to get advice on how best to help them in hotter months.

How to avoid a hot cat in the first place

Many of the ways you can avoid heat exhaustion with your cat seem obvious but sometimes the most obvious actions are not always taken, so it’s best to remember these few important tips:

Don’t leave your cat in a hot car

This should go without saying, but a good reminder nonetheless that hot cars and cats don’t mix. Even on days that might seem mildly warm and when your car is parked in the shade, it is still too hot for your cat. So if you have to travel with your furry friend, be sure to take them with you wherever you go so they can stay cool.

Keep plenty of fresh water around your house

A hydrated cat is a happy cat – especially in hot weather. So when it’s hot outside, remember to place a few more bowls of water throughout the house for your cat to drink a lot.

Close the blinds

Cats love to lounge around and, often, it’s in the warm glow of the sun rays that flow through your windows. However, these sun rays are magnified in heat during the summer months, making a bask in the warm glow feel like a sweat session in a sauna. When the temperatures outside start to rise, increase the cooling effects inside by closing your blinds, curtains, and shades. Don’t worry – your cat will find another suitable place to lounge.

Even though our feline friends are famous for seeking spots to sunbathe, the truth is that too much heat is not good for them. While you can’t control the heat and humidity outside, you can certainly control how it feels inside. So when summer starts to turn up the heat, set your indoor temperatures to cool and make sure your cat is comfortable with Omlet’s cat bowls, and their very own cat cooling mat.

Cat on Omlet cat shelves with a glass of milk

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This entry was posted in Cats


Dogs and Swimming Pools

While it’s true that most dogs can swim, not all of them actually enjoy it. Some dogs’ idea of swimming involves paddling for dry land as quickly as possible, while some take to the water as if they were otters in a previous life.

With some breeds, the clue is in the name. The Irish Water Spaniel and the Portuguese Water Dog, for example, love taking the plunge, as do Poodles, Newfoundlands, Setters, Retrievers and many more. Some dogs, however, are simply not built for swimming. Dachshunds, with their short legs, and Pugs and English Bulldogs, with their short necks and poor breathing, struggle in water.

When confronted with lakes and rivers on a walk, the dog will decide for itself whether or not it fancies a quick dip. In a private pool, however, you need to be aware of the various safety and hygiene issues, because at some point your pet is bound to take to the water.

Mastering the Doggy Paddle

If the pool is a public one, dogs will simply not be allowed, so safety issues don’t arise. Pools in people’s backyards, however, become just as much a part of the dog’s playground as the humans’. Rule number one for pool owners – or for owners who visit friends with dog-friendly pools – is to make sure your dog is safe in the water.

A weak swimmer will tire very quickly and can soon get into trouble if unsupervised. Training your dog to swim to safety is therefore very important. Using your usual “Come!” command will usually work well. For smaller dogs, or if the pool is high-sided, a ramp should be attached to the side to allow the dog to clamber out. If the pool has steps, make sure the dog knows where they are. If the pool is large, make your dog jump in from different points, and guide them to the exit each time, to make sure they have a clear mental map of how to get out.

Another popular option is a dog life-jacket, which will allow your pet to swim while preventing it from sinking fast if things go wrong. If you never leave the dog unsupervised, these shouldn’t really be necessary; but if you are having a busy afternoon, your eye might not always be on your pet, so a dog flotation vest is great for ensuring peace of mind.

Some dogs really take to floats and inflatables (claw-proof ones made specifically for dogs, ideally). They can use them to take a break from paddling, or can simply lie on them like a human on a sun lounger.

If a dog gets itself into serious difficulties and needs rescuing, knowing how to administer CPR (Cardiopulmonary resuscitation) can save the pet’s life. There are tutorials available for this online, or you could ask your vet for advice.

Don’t Drink the Water

Dogs can quickly overheat if the sun is beating down, and they may naturally take to water to cool down. Swimming is hot business, though, and it’s far better for your pet to cool down in the shade with some fresh water to drink.

And that’s another hazard – a hot, thirsty dog in a pool will do what come naturally and drink some of the pool water. If they lap up too much of the chlorinated water, they may become sick. Again, providing some fresh water somewhere cool and shaded will prevent them drinking from the pool.

Just like a human, a dog who has spent time in the pool will need rinsing off, to remove the potentially irritating chlorine and other chemicals from its fur, eyes and skin.

Your Dog Loves the Pool, But Does the Pool Love Your Dog?

There are three major issues for a swimming pool used by dogs: bacteria, hair, and wear & tear.

The bacteria is associated with poo and wee. The dog doesn’t need to actually relieve itself in the pool for these contaminants to be released into the water. However, as long as your pool is properly maintained and chemically treated, the bacteria will be killed, so this should not be an issue.

The hair factor is more of a problem. Dog hair will accumulate in the pool filter surprisingly quickly if your pet sheds a lot. A good brushing before swimming will help, but you will still need to clean the filter and other pool machinery more often than you would with human-only swimmers.

Wear and tear is an issue with doggy paddlers because of their claws. They will scrabble at the sides of a pool, and at the bottom of a shallow area. A pool lined with plaster, pebbles or tile will withstand the clawing, while plastic or vinyl-lined pool may spring a leak. You should also bear in mind that dog claws and children swimming in the same pool may be asking for trouble, too.

Follow these simple guidelines and precautions, and pools can be enjoyed by dogs and owners alike. But don’t force the issue – some dogs love the wet stuff, while others prefer to keep their feet on dry land.

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This entry was posted in Dogs


6 Steps to Starting Seeds in Your Girls’ Eggshells

Growing seeds in hen eggshells

Next time you’re about to throw away your empty egg shells, spare the food waste bin and keep hold of them. Many people use crushed up egg shells in gardening to add calcium to the soil, however we have another great way you can use egg shells to add to your garden. Many propagators or seed starter tubs are made out of plastic, which isn’t great for the environment. Why not use your empty egg shells to start your next batch of seeds?! It’s so quick and easy to do!


1. Firstly rinse out the shells, and then let them dry.

2. Once dry, fill the egg shells halfway with compost and sit them in the egg carton.

3. Sprinkle a little water on the compost and then add your chosen seeds to the compost.

4. Spread a thin layer of compost on top and drizzle a little bit more water.

5. Then place in a sunny spot indoors – a window ledge is a great place to start seeds.

6. Keep watering your eggshell seeds each night, and after a few days you should start to see them sprout!


Once they’re too big for the shell then transfer to a bigger spot to continue growing indoors or outdoors depending on the chosen seeds (see packet for details).

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This entry was posted in Crafting


10 Things Not to Do in Summer if You’re a Chicken Keeper

Purple Omlet Eglu Chicken Coop in summer

1. Don’t leave the coop and run in the sun

If possible, move the coop into a shaded spot, maybe under a tree or in the south-facing side of the backyard that doesn’t get as much sun. This means that it will be nice and cool when the girls want to go to bed in the evening, or if one of them wants to go in to lay during the day. The Eglu chicken coops are so easy to move that you, on a really hot day, could effortlessly move it around the backyard as the sun moves.

2. Don’t leave the water for too long

Your chickens will drink more in summer. To minimise the risk of algae in the water, as well as dust and dirt from the chickens, change the water at least once a day in hot weather. Place the drinker in a shaded spot on the run and make sure it’s really cold when you put it out. 

3. Don’t overfeed your birds

Dried corn and grains take longer to digest than pellets or fresh food, which wastes energy and heats the body unnecessarily. The chickens will not need to eat as much in hot weather, and if they were to get hungry during the day, your backyard will be full of bugs and fresh green material at this time of year.

4. Don’t leave your chickens alone for too long

When it’s really hot outside it’s important that chicken owners keep an eye on their flock to look for signs of overheating. An open beak, panting and wings held away from the body are signs the chicken is hot. If you think one of your hens is really struggling, try dipping her bottom in a bucket of cold water. This will cool her down for a bit and allow the body to reset.

5. Don’t depend on water

You can leave a small paddling pool or shallow containers out for your chickens to cool down in, but it’s unfortunately not very likely your hens will use them. It might be better to create a mud bath in a corner of the run; chickens are much more likely to approach mud and sand to cool down than water.

6. Don’t play with your chickens

Interaction with the chickens might lead to more movement for them, which increases their body temperature. If you want to spend time with your pets, or need to pick them up for health checks, do so early in the morning or late at night when it’s cooler.

7. Don’t cover the run completely

Covering your chicken run with a lot of covers might seem like a good idea to create a shady spot, but if you don’t let air circulate, it’s likely to become a boiling tunnel of warm air. It’s extremely important to have ventilation, so that fresh air can move around. This goes for your coop as well. The Eglu’s cleverly designed ventilation system allows air to circulate in the coop at all times, keeping it nice, cool and fresh even on the hottest of days. Choose a few darker covers to give your pets shade on the run as well.

8. Don’t leave the eggs

You’re probably getting fewer eggs than normal during the warmest weeks of the year. That’s completely normal, chickens don’t lay as much when they are hot, and some go broody and stop laying completely. Although the eggs won’t go off if you leave them in the nest box of an Eglu for a day, eggs in the nest can encourage broodiness and result in egg eating, so it’s good to collect all as soon as you discover them.

9. Don’t put off cleaning

It’s always important to keep the coop nice and clean for your girls, but maybe even more so in summer. Parasites and pests are stronger when it’s warmer, including red mite, so make sure to use a bird safe disinfectant and cover roosting bars and perches in mite powder to prevent problems at least once a week.

10. Don’t treat all chickens the same

If you have a flock with mixed breeds or have had chickens in the past but now own a different breed, remember that different chickens need different care. Some breeds are much better than others at handling heat, and some really struggle. Read up on the breeds you’ve got here, and take extra care of vulnerable birds.

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This entry was posted in Chickens


How the Weather Forecast Can Help Chicken Keepers

While most people check the weather forecast to help them plan their week activities or outfits, chicken keepers can also be using it to predict what accessories their coop needs to ensure their girls are as comfortable as possible. 

From sun to snow, wind to wet, the breakfast time weather reports and the handy app on your phone are all giving you helpful hints that you might be ignoring.

? TEMPERATURE ?

Firstly, the most obvious indicator: the predicted temperature for the coming 10 days. Depending on what time of year we are in, this can be super helpful or utterly confusing if it is varying drastically. But let’s think about what we can act upon.

In winter, if the predicted temperature is at below 0 degrees celsius for more than 5 days in a row or the temperature is near freezing and you have very few chickens in your coop, you may want to consider attaching the Extreme Temperature Blanket to your Eglu to give your chickens some extra help with keeping warm, without limiting the coop ventilation. 

During hot summer months, when temperatures can be above and beyond 30 degrees celsius daily in some countries, it is wise to move your chicken coop into an area that is in the shade for as much of the day as possible. For your chickens, daily health checks are essential to ensure they are not suffering with the high temperatures. If your coop is attached to or inside a secure run, you can leave your coop door open to increase airflow at nighttime without your girls being exposed to predators.

☀️ SUN ☀️

When the sun is shining, it is tempting to cover your chickens’ run with shades so that it is completely protected from the sun inside. However, this can have the opposite effect on what you intended. Instead of shading and cooling the area, lots of shades create a tunnel which traps the heat, like a greenhouse. 

It is best to keep them in a shaded area, and protect one side of the run from the sun. If your chickens are out free ranging most of the day, make sure that they have access to shady patches in the garden, and that their food and water is also in shade. 

❄️ SNOW ❄️

Exciting for some, but for others a weather warning for snow can be very disappointing. You may want to consider sheltering your coop’s run with clear covers to prevent as much snow getting on the ground inside the run as possible. If snow is predicted for the foreseeable future, you may want to prepare for long term icy conditions and bring your coop closer to the house so it is easier to check on your chickens, and they can benefit from some of the shelter your house might provide. During the snow, be sure to dry off damp feathers and remove any chunks of ice from claws. Increase the amount of bedding and food you are giving your chickens too as this will help them stay warm. 

If you have time, it might be wise to consider how effective your chicken coop will be against the bitter cold. If you have a wooden coop, check if it is water-tight and well insulated. If you are not confident in your wooden coop, consider upgrading to a sturdy plastic alternative, like the Eglu Cube. It’s twin-wall insulation works in the same way as double glazing to keep the cold out of the coop, and the heat in during winter. The plastic material is waterproof and super easy to clean out quickly (especially important on chilly winter days).

☁️ CLOUD ☁️

The most boring of all weather forecasts, but often a rest bite from other more extreme conditions. During winter, a few cloudy days should raise the temperature slightly and give you a good opportunity to clean out your coop and thoroughly check on your chickens and make any changes needed for whatever the forecast predicts for the coming days.

? RAIN ?

Some weather reports are more helpful than others when it comes to the exact timing and chance of there being rain. But if you’re looking at days of 90% chance of heavy showers, it would be wise to act fast and get some protective clear covers over the run. If the ground under your chickens’ coop and run is already extremely muddy and wet, you might want to consider moving them to a new patch of grass, and maybe even laying down a base material, like wood shavings, to prevent it developing into a swamp!

? WIND ?

How you react to a windy forecast completely depends on the wind speeds predicted. Light winds, less than 25 mph, shouldn’t cause much of a problem. You might want to add some windbreaks around the base of your Eglu and a large clear cover down the most exposed side. However, in extreme high winds, the worst thing you can do is completely conceal your run, particularly a larger Walk in Run, with covers from top to bottom. In a large run, the mesh holes allow the wind to flow through without causing any issues to the structure, and a clear cover round one bottom corner of the run will provide chickens enough shelter. If you cover the run completely, the wind will be hammering against it and is more likely to cause the structure to lift or move. 

If your chickens are in a smaller run attached to their coop, we recommend moving it to a position where it will be most protected from the wind and any falling debris, for example, against a sturdy building wall. The Eglu’s wheels allow you to easily move the coops around your garden to suit the conditions. If you are keeping your chickens in their Eglu coop and run, and not free ranging during dangerous weather conditions, consider adding some entertaining toys and treat dispenser for them to prevent boredom, such as the Peck Toy or Perch


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This entry was posted in Chickens


Overcoming chicken-keeping challenges in the year ahead

Hens spend their entire lives outdoors. This means they have to cope with everything the year throws at them — from summer heat waves and winter chills, to year-round downpours. Being hardy birds, they take much of this in stride, but they benefit from a helping hand from their humans. Here are ways to help your flock and prepare for the chicken-keeping challenges in the year ahead

Family outside in summer with their chickens in the Omlet Eglu Cube Chicken Coop

Summer

It’s amazing to see the transformation in your chickens as the seasons change. Gone are the downy, fluffy winter and early spring jackets your hens sported mere months ago. Instead, you may now notice your hens’ feathers slowly becoming more dull, and they are spending more and more time under shaded areas. 

For many flock-raisers, summer poses the largest threat to chickens. The main risks that flocks face in the summer months are heat and too much sunlight. Be sure to have plenty of shaded areas where your chickens frequent, and keep fresh, cool water available at all times. A chicken coop that provides shade itself, like the space under the Eglu Cube or the Eglu Go Up, is ideal for the summer months.

The Eglu Cube chicken coop is designed to reduce moisture and increase airflow through its ingenious ventilation design. Twin-wall insulation and vents along the back allow for cool air to circulate while keeping the warm air out. Plastic doesn’t hold onto moisture the way that wood does, so your chickens can find relief from the damp, humid air. The Eglu Cube also offers a shaded area beneath the coop, with the option to add heavy-duty run covers to the sides and top of the run for additional protection from the sun. And, with added handles and wheels, the Eglu Cube can be moved to shadier, cooler spots as summer progresses. 

Here are some other methods to alleviate heat-related stress in your flock during the summer months: 

  • Keep the water supply full, as hens drink more in warm weather. Add ice cubes to waterers if possible throughout the day to keep the water temperature at a refreshing level.
  • Provide a dust bath – either a dry area of ground in the garden, or in a container in the chicken run. Cat litter trays, kiddie pools, and even old tires with the rims removed make great basins for dust baths. 
  • Offer treats like frozen corn or other chicken-safe veggies in a chicken treat dispenser or chicken peck toy
  • Look for any signs of heat stress in your hens. Open-mouth breathing (panting), lethargy, agitation, increased saliva production, or any other concerning symptoms should be reported to your veterinarian. Bring any chicken exhibiting heat stress into an air-conditioned space, but refrain from employing any other cooling measures until hearing from your veterinarian. It can be dangerous for an overheated chicken to have their body temperature brought down too quickly. 

Fortunately, the “dog days of summer” usually yield to lower temperatures at night. You may want to offer more space outside of the coop for your chickens to roost overnight in the warmer months, as they will need extra space away from each other’s body heat during this season. A Freestanding Chicken Perch or PoleTree will give your hens aerial space to roost if they need to spread out at night. Just be sure that all of their enclosures are predator-resistant.

Autumn

Autumn is a favourite season for both flocks and their keepers. Bugs are still abundant, the temperatures are comfortable, and gardens offer hen-friendly snacking opportunities when gardeners rotate crops. 

Hens will often moult this time of year in preparation for colder temperatures, so they need a good diet to help them stay healthy and grow new feathers. Extra vitamins and minerals will boost feather growth, and a little apple cider vinegar in their water will help them grow healthy and glossy plumage. Egg production will cease or drastically reduce while hens are moulting, but once they’ve completed their transformation, your hens will resume their laying schedule. The shorter days will prompt chickens to lay less frequently, but good layers will continue to produce eggs during the fall and winter. 

Girl outside in autumn with Freestanding Chicken Perch

Winter

Depending on your location, winter can be one of the most challenging seasons for all outdoor animals. No matter where you live, there’s a lot working against both humans and chickens when cold weather sets in – but thankfully chickens are naturally equipped to endure lower temperatures. Because of this, chicken-keeping in the winter isn’t much different from the rest of the year, but a few preparations can go a long way in helping your hens thrive in the cold. 

Cold-weather chicken considerations

  • Although chickens cope well with the cold, they’ll need some help when it’s both cold and wet. Keeping hens in an insulated Eglu Chicken Coop is a good place to start, with the option to add extra chicken coop weather protection to both the run and the coop. This is especially helpful if you live in an area that receives heavy snowfall. 
  • Perches in the run enable chickens to cuddle up when it’s cold – which is essential in the winter months. The Omlet Chicken Perch, being composed of eucalyptus, a strong, untreated wood, prevents chickens’ feet from becoming too cold. Offering perches above the frozen ground of the run gives your hens’ toes a break from the chill. 
  • In sustained sub-zero temperatures, rubbing Vaseline on your hens’ combs and wattles will help prevent them from becoming frostbitten.
  • Keep your hens’ feet dry in wet weather by lining the run with wood chippings, straw, or hay.

Winter daylight hours

  • Chickens usually return to the coop to roost at dusk. But in the winter, you may find your birds trying to get more time outside on the short days. If your hens are prone to wandering around in the dark, a high visibility hen coat will help you locate them – and also ensure they’re visible to anyone else, should they stray from your garden.
  • Installing an automatic chicken coop door with a coop light will help your hens adhere to bedtime. The door can open and close automatically based on the amount of daylight, a specified time, or manually. The coop light will help beckon wandering birds to bed when darkness falls, as chickens will naturally gravitate toward a light source. 

Your chickens’ health during colder months 

Keep an eye out for coughing, sneezing, lethargy, or other signs of chicken illness. Older or weaker chickens can become more vulnerable to illness when the cold weather sets in.

  • Egg production will decrease – but this doesn’t mean no eggs for breakfast. While your hens may not lay as frequently, and some may stop altogether throughout the colder months, a flock of 4 or more chickens should still provide an adequate supply of eggs for your family during the winter. 
  • Make sure your hens’ diet consists of high-quality feed and scratch, and consider adding some extra chicken vitamins and minerals to boost their immune systems. Offer hay or greens in a chicken treat holder to provide a nutritional activity on cold days. 
  • Their water will freeze, so be prepared to break the ice, and have some spare water dispensers ready in case the waterers freeze solid. Pour hot water over any icy water sources throughout the day to help keep things thawed. Consider placing submersible bird bath heaters in your chickens’ waterers to keep them thawed. 
  • On the upside, winter might kill off any lingering flies, mites, and other pests your chickens encounter during the warmer months.

A boy in a snowy Eglu coop with his chickens

Spring

As the days lengthen, your hens will start laying more eggs. Vegetation comes back to life, and chickens find insects, plants, and other findings worth scratching around for. Your chickens will likely be wanting to spend more time outside in the warmer temperatures and longer days, but predators also spend more waking hours roaming in the spring. 

Protect your chickens from awakening predators 

Predatory animals such as foxes, wolves, and badgers will also be on the prowl after a lean winter. Keeping your chickens in a secure, covered run is vitally important during early spring when nature’s predators are also taking advantage of the changing seasons. Automatic chicken coop doors will ensure the hens are in and out at the right times, and will prevent predators from gaining access after-hours. The door will also let your chickens out in the morning, so that you can enjoy weekend mornings in bed as the days get longer. 

Take proactive steps to reduce chicken coop pests

It’s also important to note that mites and parasites make their debut in the spring, so if you don’t have an easy-to-clean plastic chicken coop, be sure to treat your coops and runs to get ahead of the pests. Mites thrive in wooden surfaces, so housing your hens in a plastic coop is a first line in defence to eliminate pests. Change bedding daily, and clean the interior of your coop frequently to keep your chickens healthy and happy when mites threaten to emerge.

Man with his chickens in spring, using weather protection on the Omlet Eglu Go Up Chicken Coop

Year-round chicken care with Omlet 

At Omlet, we’re here to support chicken keepers all year round. By keeping your hens in an Eglu Chicken Coop and Walk In Chicken Run that are both easy to maintain and clean, you’ll create an environment that is enjoyable for both you and your flock no matter the season. These, along with Walk In Run Covers, make seasonal preparation quick and easy so that the changes in weather, amount of daylight, and looming predators don’t detract from the wondrous connection you’ve created with your chickens. So here’s to another year of chicken-keeping, the Omlet way. 

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This entry was posted in Chickens


Activities for kids and pets to do together

Girl holding dog's paw, sat in Omlet Fido Studio Dog Crate

We all know that pets are not just animals, they’re members of our family. So for the pet parents who are also human parents, why not foster an even stronger bond between your children and four-legged friends by engaging them in exciting activities that promote laughter, joy, and unforgettable memories? Get ready to unleash the fun with this treasure trove of ideas that will ignite imaginations and provide endless hours of entertainment of engaging activities for your kids and pets to do together.

Bake treats for your pets

Kids love to help in the kitchen! And when they know their culinary efforts will end in a delicious delight for their favourite furry family member, they’ll be sure to raise their helping hands. Just make sure the recipe you choose for your pet is safe for them to eat, and abide by the same rule used with kids – treats are to be enjoyed on a limited basis. 

For a tail-wagging breakfast, let your kids break the eggs and blend the bananas to make these dog-friendly pancakes. The best part of this activity is that every member of the family can taste the treats. 

Find new games to play with your cat

When the cat’s away, the mice will play. But when kids and cats are together, play is even better! Most cats love to play games because it mimics their natural instincts to pounce and bat with their paws. So before allowing your child to play closely with any pet, make sure they understand how to handle them safely.

An interactive game of chase with feathers, cat toys, or scarves makes for a fun-filled time for both kids and cats alike. Want to take the fun outside? Let your littles roam free together in a safely enclosed Catio while chasing bubbles all around. And for the senior cats who may find the chase games too much, encourage your child to stretch alongside their favourite feline on a sturdy cat scratching post.

Teach your dog a new trick

They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, but that’s simply just not true. With the right encouragement, some patience, and lots of love, your dog can learn new things at any age in life. And what better way for your kids and canine to spend some quality time together than with a fun new trick?

Summer is a great time to let your kids get involved in teaching Fido how to fetch a stick or even learn a new command like “sit and shake”. Make sure your child keeps plenty of dog treats in their pocket to give as a reward for the newly learned behaviour. And because new tricks require lots of mental stimulation, make sure you have a comfortable and supportive dog bed where your furry friend can rest after all their hard work. By the time summer is over, your kids and dog will impress the whole family with all they have both learned.

Pocket money

Chores are a great way to teach your kids the importance of responsibility, but they’re also a great way to let your child earn some spending cash. And learning the value of work at a young age will always pay off later. So in an effort to get your kids and pets more time together while also completing needed work around the house, why not have them clean out the chicken coop to earn a bit of extra pocket money? 

The Eglu chicken coops are so easy to clean that anyone tall enough to reach in and touch a hen will be able to get it spotless with ease. With a little bit of pet-safe disinfectant and water, your chickens’ home will be sparkly clean and hygienically healthy in no time. Plus, what kid doesn’t like to use a water hose? This simple chore of cleaning and collecting eggs not only allows your child more interaction with the hens, but it makes one less task for you to do. Win-win for everyone!

Homemade toys for rabbits

When it comes to fun for rabbits, Omlet has you covered. But if you’re looking for activities for your child and rabbit to enjoy together, look no further than your own garden. One of the best ways to get everyone outside and having fun is to go on a garden scavenger hunt. Have your kids locate a willow tree and collect some twigs to weave into a ball or a wreath. Your rabbits will love playing with their new toys as well as nibbling on the nutritious wood, and your kids will feel accomplished in creating a new rabbit masterpiece.

But the floppy-eared fun doesn’t stop there! If you’ve got an old towel or a ripped pair of jeans you’re getting rid of you can make a rag doll for your rabbits. Have your kids use their creativity to make something beautiful. Even just tying a knot in the middle of a strip of sturdy fabric will provide hours of fun for rabbits to tear apart in their outdoor rabbit run. Just make sure to take it away before they’ve ruined it completely – you don’t want them to ingest too much fabric.

Photoshoot

Capturing the bond between children and their furry companions in photos creates cherished memories that can be treasured for years to come. During a photoshoot, kids and pets can engage in various poses and interactions that showcase their special relationship. This activity not only allows kids and pets to have fun together but also encourages their creativity and self-expression. It’s also a great opportunity to teach children about patience, empathy, and respect for animals. Have fun with different locations and colourful outfits (if your pet obliges!) and make the photos as creative as you want. Here are our best tips for taking better photos of your pets.

Abstract paw art

If you have children, you likely have several crayon drawings hanging on your fridge. Why not add to the gallery with some abstract paw art made by your favourite furry child? Let your dog’s creative juices flow by helping your child work with your pup to create a beautiful piece of art. 

Get some toxic-free, water-based paint and gently put your dog’s paws in it. With the help of some dog treats, guide your dog to a blank canvas and let them walk all over it, creating an abstract paw-print painting. You can even have your kids get in on the fun by adding their handprints as well! Be sure to have water on hand to clean everyone’s paws and best to do this activity outside to avoid the risk of paw prints on carpets and furniture.

Omlet brings kids and pets together

At Omlet, we know the bond between kids and their pets is a truly special one. Engaging in activities together not only strengthens their connection but also offers countless benefits for both of them. With our personal pet experience and ingenious expert designs, we create products for dogs, cats, chickens, rabbits, and more, that will bring out the best in everyone in the family. So try out one of these shared experiences with your kids and pets and create a lifelong friendship that will leave pawprints on their hearts forever. 

Girl in Omlet Outdoor Run holding guinea pig

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Going on holiday? What about the pets?

Summertime… Beach stays, trips abroad, hikes… It is a great opportunity to take a break with your family and keep daily stress at bay. You book a lovely hotel with your other half, you read a map with your children asking them where they want to go, you pack your suitcases, you… Wait! Aren’t you forgetting someone? “Babe, what about the cat? Is he coming with us?!”

Most pet owners tend to forget about it: having a pet means new responsibilities and taking care of them when you go on holidays is one of them. Unfortunately, too many people still ignore it. The months of December, January and February are critical since many people seem to struggle when it comes to taking care of their pets while also going on holiday. Read our tips below to make sure your pets will have a great time this summer, just like you!

CHICKENS

You might be an adventurous Frenchman aiming to sail around the world with your hen (https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-36475672). However, in all other cases, we recommend that you do not take your chickens on holidays with you. The best thing to do is to ask some friends or neighbours to take care of them while you are away, offering them to help themselves to eggs. If you are lucky enough to have an Eglu Cube on wheels, you can even move your coop directly into your neighbour’s garden!

GUINEA PIGS AND RABBITS

Just like with chickens, it is better to leave your rabbit or guinea pig at home and ask a friend, ideally someone they already know, to come and look after them. If you still decide to take them with you, or if you don’t have any other choice, be very careful with temperature change. These smaller pets are extremely sensitive to it and a sudden temperature change could be fatal. While in the car, make sure that they are neither too hot (do not leave them next to a window or in a parked car) or too cold (do not put them in front of the air con). You also want to check that nothing is at risk of falling and hurting them in the cage: take away the bottle and the feeder and stop regularly to give them some water and food. Remember that rodents and rabbits are very shy animals that like to have their own routine and tend to struggle with change.

CATS

You can definitely take them with you, but in most cases you don’t have to: cats are independent animals that can take care of themselves for a few days. Fill their bowls with food and water before leaving. If you are away for less than 10 days, ask a friend to come and check on them (one or two short visits a day should do).  

If you are away for more than 10 days, it is better to leave your cat with some relatives, preferably people who already know your cat and who don’t have any animals that the cat won’t get along with. You can also put your cat in a boarding kennel. However, keep in mind that this can be risky since your cat could feel abandoned (new place, new faces…) and get depressed. Before taking them to the cattery you can give them some soft and natural tranquillizer, like Bach flower, to help them adjust.

DOGS

Dogs are probably the most complicated animal to deal with when going on holidays. You can’t just leave them at home with food and water. This is not only bad for your dog, but could also lead you to be accused of animal cruelty. The best option is definitely to book a seat for your dog in your car and help them pack their suitcase!

Why should I take my dog with me? 

Of course you can leave your dog with your friends or family (preferably someone they already know). However, keep in mind that dogs are very social animals and thrive on their owner’s company. For them, holidays will be a fantastic opportunity to spend some quality time with their favourite humans. Moreover, since you are on holidays, you will have more free time and will be able to spend entire days with your dog, which will make them extremely happy. No more long and boring days waiting for you at home! No doubt that you and your family will also be delighted to spend the whole day playing and exercising with your dog. They can also help you to interact with fellow holiday makers: many people won’t be able to resist giving them some attention!

How to organise a trip with a dog

Here is a list of what you can do to make sure your dog is ready for the holidays and everything goes fine while you two are away from home:

  • Before going, make sure your dog is used to travelling in a car. Some dogs can be car sick and it is good to prepare them, especially if you’re planning on a road trip and are spending a lot of time in the car!
  • Make sure your dog knows some basic commands such as heel and sit. If they are able to go on a walk without pulling on the lead, it is even better!
  • Check that their vaccinations are up to date, and if you’re going abroad, double check what the requirements are far in advance.
  • Bring everything they may need: food, of course, but also a first-aid kit, their health record book, the lead, the food and water bowls, the crate, their favourite toys, some poo bags… It is very important to take your dog’s food with you if you are going abroad since you can’t make sure you’ll find their favourite brand in the country you’re visiting.
  • While travelling, put your dog in their cage in the boot of the car.
  • Before visiting a place, make sure they accept pets. Never go to a hotel before checking it. Likewise, you will easily find a list of dog friendly beaches online.
  • Check that your dog is not too hot. If you’re going on a walk, don’t forget to bring a bowl and a good amount of water.
  • When settling your dog somewhere, do it properly: make sure they have some food, some water, some shadow… Even if it is just for an hour!
  • If you think it is necessary, you can fit your dog with a GPS collar. This can be useful when you go hiking in the wild. You can also download various apps on your mobile to help you locate a lost dog, find a vets near you or keep record of your dog’s health.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

In some states you can travel for free with your pet on most public transport: buses, taxis, trains and ferries. However, to make sure everything goes smoothly, always check that that is the case before you board. Be aware that coach companies generally do not accept pets except for assistance dogs. Remember that passengers can complain about your animal’s behaviour so try and make sure your pet will be able to behave themselves while travelling.

When travelling abroad, make sure you can go on public transport with your pet since this can vary according to the country (in some places you will have to book a ticket for your animal).

If you’re travelling by plane, mention that you have an animal when booking and check that your animal’s vaccination is up to date. On the day of the departure, make sure to arrive early. Cats and small dogs will generally be allowed to fly with you in the cabin. However, bigger dogs will have to travel in a heated and pressurised part of the cargo hold. Birds, rabbits and hamsters are often forbidden but some airlines may accept them.

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How To Care for Your Rabbits in Summer

Brown and white rabbit in the grass

Summer is the greatest time of the year, but when the temperature rises it’s important to make sure your rabbits, and their home, are ready for the warmer weather. Rabbits are generally very hardy animals, but they actually tend to deal better with cold spells than with extreme heat. 

It might be tempting to move your outdoor rabbits inside your air-conditioned house to help them stay cool, but sudden changes in temperature can actually be worse for them than  staying outside in the heat. It is, however, important to know that rabbits can die from heat stroke, so make sure that you’re doing everything you can to prevent your rabbits from getting ill. 

The Hutch

The easiest thing to do to make sure your rabbits are comfortable is to get them a hutch that stays cool even in the height of summer. The Eglu Go hutch has twin-wall insulation that keeps the heat out, and makes the temperature in the hutch stay relatively stable throughout the day. It also has a draught-free ventilation system that encourages air to flow through the hutch without creating a nasty draft. 

Another important thing is shade. If possible, place the rabbits’ hutch and play area in a shady part of the backyard, ideally under a tree or next to a building that blocks the sun. If different parts of the yard are shaded at different times of the day you might be able to move the play area as the day goes on. This is very easy with Omlet’s Zippi runs and tunnel system. If you don’t have any natural shade you will need to add covers and sun shades to the run to make sure that your rabbits can be outside without having to be in direct sunlight.

Food and Water

Make sure that your rabbits have plenty of fresh water at all times. Consider changing the water several times a day when it’s very hot; rabbits are much more likely to drink more if the water is nice and cool, just as you would. Speaking of water, fill a few plastic bottles and put them in the freezer for a few hours. You can then place them on the run or in the hutch for your rabbits to lean against when they’re feeling warm. Prepare a few bottles so you can swap them around when the first ones have melted. 

Your bunnies will also love to eat cool and refreshing things when the sun is out. Try washing the vegetables you are giving to your rabbits with cold water before you bring them out to the hutch. 

Grooming

Other things you can do if you think your rabbits are finding the summer a bit sweaty is to remove all their excess fur. Brush your pets more regularly in summer to make sure they’re not carrying around unnecessary layers. If you think your pets are looking particularly hot you can mist their ears with cool (but not ice cold) water from a spray bottle. Do however make sure the water doesn’t get into the ear canal. Another important thing to think about is the rabbits probably won’t appreciate getting handled during the hottest hours of the day, so leave play time to later in the evening. 

Fly Strike

It is also very important to know that the risk of fly strike is much higher during the summer months. Fly strike is caused by flies getting attracted to damp fur, urine and faeces and laying their eggs in the rabbit’s bottom. When the maggots are born after a few hours they eat the rabbit’s flesh and release toxins into the body. Fly strike can kill a healthy rabbit who just happens to have loose stools for a day or two, but if you know that your rabbit sometimes struggles to clean itself it is extra important that you check their bottoms daily. If you see any signs of fly strike, contact your vet immediately. The same goes for heat stroke. Don’t panic and dip your rabbit in cold water, instead take your rabbit to a cool room inside to try to lower their body temperature while you phone the vet. 

Brown rabbit in Omlet Outdoor Rabbit Run with pink flowers behind them

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How the Eglu Keeps Chickens Cool

Pink Omlet Eglu Cube Chicken Coop, pink flowers

Wooden Chicken Coops and Insulation

Keeping your pets warm in winter and cool in summer is one of the best ways you can help them stay healthy. But this is often easier said than done. Traditionally chicken coops and rabbit hutches have been made from wood. This has its advantages: it’s an easy material to work with, it’s customisable and it looks attractive. However, when it comes to coping with the weather, it can leave a lot to be desired. Wood is not a very good thermal insulator, meaning if it’s hot outside the temperature will transfer through to the inside quickly. 

Air as a Thermal Insulator 

Perhaps surprisingly, a much better thermal insulator is air.  But how can something so thin that you can’t even see keep our pets comfortably insulated from the elements? It’s precisely because it’s so thin that it’s so effective. Heat is conducted between an area of more heat to an area of less heat by one of three processes: conduction, radiation or convection. In conduction warmer molecules vibrate rapidly and collide with other nearby molecules passing on that energy. If the material that the heat is trying to pass through has few molecules in it then it will be harder for the heat to transfer through it. This is precisely what happens if you have a warm surface separated from another surface by a layer of air.  

The Eglu Cube chicken coop has twin walled insulation

Because air is not a good conductor it is commonly used as an insulator in everything from buildings (double glazing, cavity walls) to cooking utensils, drinking flasks and even the high tech chicken coops. 

Eglu chicken coops have a unique twin wall system that takes full advantage of air’s great insulating property to keep your pets comfortable all year round. Within the walls of the Eglu is an air pocket which acts as a barrier, stopping hot and cold temperatures penetrating into the inside of the house, so your chickens can stay warm in winter, and cool in summer. 

The Eglus also feature a draft-free ventilation system designed to increase the air flow throughout the coops, keeping chickens at a comfortable temperature. These air vents are discretely located around the coop, and specifically designed so they do not allow drafts over the nesting box. A well ventilated coop is not only beneficial for keeping chickens cool, but it is also extremely important for preventing your hens from suffering with respiratory issues.

For evidence of the Eglu’s cooling properties, take a look at this video showing how much slower an ice lolly melts when inside the coop…

 

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7 ways to help your chickens stay cool this summer

Family outside in summer with their chickens in the Omlet Eglu Cube Chicken Coop

Did you know that chickens can’t sweat? Instead, chickens use their legs, combs and wattles to lead heat away from their bodies. They also pant and spread their wings to get some air through those feathers. Chickens also enjoy lying down in the shade when it’s very hot, and of course, they drink lots of water. Did you know that it is actually easier for chickens to keep themselves warm in winter than it is for them to cool down during the summer? It isn’t just an issue of comfort either – chickens can die of heatstroke. Since chickens have a hard time cooling themselves down and when it gets extremely hot they rely on you to help them. So, what can you do to help your chickens keep cool in the summer heat? Here are our 7 top tips.

1. Warm weather means plenty of water

Eggs consist mainly of water, so producing an egg absorbs a lot of water from a hen’s body. Drinking cool water is also one of the main ways chickens cool themselves down. Your chickens will therefore need lots of fresh, clean and cool water in the heat of the summer. It’s best to change the water every day to make sure they have this. It’s also a good idea to provide several water sources so all your chickens can drink at the same time and avoid fighting for access.

Another way you can use water to help your chickens cool down is by providing some shallow pools where they can dip and cool their feet and legs – remember, this is one of the areas where heat leaves their bodies. Try filling some shallow bowls or tubs and leaving them around in the run or your garden. If your chickens don’t like to stand directly in the water you can try placing a brick in there which will be cooled by the water and the chickens can then stand on top of it.

2. Soak up the shade

It’s absolutely essential to provide shade for your chickens and even more so when it gets really hot. If you let your chickens free-range in the garden they might be able to find shade under trees and bushes but in any case, it’s a good idea to provide shade in the run as well. You can easily create shady spots in the run by having a raised coop and/or attaching chicken run covers.

3. Summertime snacking

Try giving your hens some cool treats such as frozen berries, vegetables or pieces of fruit. You could even create hanging treats by freezing your chickens’ favourite treats in the Caddi Treat Holder or an ice cube tray with a string in the middle so they can hang in the run. Or, try keeping a whole watermelon in the fridge to cool it down before serving it as a summery treat.

Be careful not to give your chickens too many treats though, as you want to make sure they still eat their layers pellets. Chickens eat less when it’s extremely hot because digestion produces more body heat, so it’s important to make sure they eat the right things and get the vitamins and minerals they require. Try feeding your chickens during the cooler parts of the day such as in the evening.

4. Nutritional supplements

It’s also wise to give your hens supplements in the heat such as vitamins and tonics which can be added directly to their food or water. These can improve the absorption of minerals, boost your chickens’ overall health, and help them cope better with the heat. Apple cider vinegar, for example, can help with calcium absorption in the body which is essential for eggshell production.

5. Dust bath galore

Chickens love to dust bathe in the warm weather, but you might not want them scraping around in your flower beds. The best thing to do is to build another flower bed and fill it with some sand, soil and some louse powder. If you have a large flock you might even want to provide several spaces so all your chickens have a chance to dust bathe in the shade. Be sure to place the dust bath in a sheltered spot or cover it up when your chickens aren’t using it otherwise the rain might turn it into a mud bath.

6. Give them space

Your chickens will need plenty of space during the hot summer months so make sure they aren’t overcrowded. Chickens need to be able to spread out and spread their wings for ventilation, and everyone in the flock needs to be able to drink cool water and lie in the shade at any time.

7. Keeping the coop cool

All Omlet Eglu chicken coops have a unique twin-wall insulation system which works similarly to double glazing. This means your hens won’t overheat in the summer. The Eglus are also built with a draught-free ventilation system, carefully designed to avoid air blowing directly over the roosting area whilst allowing fresh air to circulate.

If you have a wooden chicken coop, it’s important to think about how you can keep the coop nice and cool for your chickens. Make sure you create plenty of ventilation either by opening windows in the coop or by using a fan. Be careful not to have too much thick and heavy bedding as it absorbs heat. Also, keep an eye out for mould if you’ve got a wooden coop. Mould can make straw and hay start to rot faster, thereby producing more heat.

Omlet and your chickens’ summer

At Omlet, we design products that are built to last a lifetime and thrive in every season. From our Omlet Eglu Chicken Coops to our Caddi Treat Holders, our innovative creations mean happy owners and even happier pets. We wish you and your chickens a lovely summer.

Pouring water into the Omlet Chicken Waterer in the Omlet Walk In Chicken Run

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Top Tips When Taking Your Dog To The Beach!

Many of us would agree that there are few things nicer on a hot summer’s day than a trip to the beach, and as long as you come prepared there is no reason to leave your pooch at home. Swimming is one of the best forms of exercise for dogs, and you can stay as long as you like without having to worry about getting home to let the dog out!

There are however a few things you need to do before you leave, and some things that are good to know when it comes to dogs and the beach. Here are our best tips for a successful outing!

 

Find a dog-friendly beach

Dogs are not always allowed on public beaches, but there is normally an area close-by where you can take your dog. Search for a dog-friendly beach nearby, read up on the rules, and make sure you follow them!

Keep an eye on your dog

Even if you’re at a dog-friendly beach you must always keep an eye on your dog, and show consideration to the other beach goers and dog owners. No one appreciates being sprayed with water from a wet dog as they’re relaxing with a good book! If you’re not absolutely sure your dog will come when you call or stay close to you, it might be best to keep it on the lead.

You also have to make sure your dog stays safe at the beach. Dogs are amazing at finding things in the sand that might not be good for them, everything from leftover barbecue ingredients to rotting fish. Glass, sharp shells, or even old fish hooks may hide in the sand, and can hurt your dog’s precious paws.

 

Teach your dog to swim

Many believe that all dogs know how to swim, but that is not the case. Even if all dogs will automatically paddle their feet if you put them in the water, there are several dog breeds that aren’t built to stay floating. Breeds with large heads and short legs will struggle to keep their head over the surface to breathe. If your dog seems to love swimming but you’re not completely sure about their ability, it might be a good idea to invest in a doggy life jacket.

That being said, there are lots of dogs that don’t really enjoy the water, or who will be perfectly happy running around in the shallow parts where they don’t have to swim. Never force a dog to come swimming with you!

Even if your dog is a strong swimmer, it’s important for you as an owner to keep an eye on them as they’re out in the water. Make sure you stay informed about currents in the water, and don’t let the dog in if there are high waves or lots of boats or jet skis around. Dogs can easily get too excited in the water and swim out into deep waters, where the current might be much stronger. You also have to supervise dogs playing and swimming with children.

Come prepared

Make sure you pack everything you need for a day at the beach. Dogs will need plenty of fresh water, so get enough for the whole family. It’s a good idea to have a collapsible water bowl, so you don’t have to make your dog drink straight from the bottle. This way you can also keep track of how much water the dog has actually had.

Bring toys that will entertain your dog throughout the day. If you’re able to throw balls or other toys down the beach, that is a perfect activity that will entertain your dogs, and give it a good amount of exercise. Just make sure the toys float if they end up in the water.

If you’re staying at the beach for a few hours, or maybe even the whole day, it’s important to make sure the dog can get some shade. If you’re not sure whether there are shaded areas where you’re going or not, bring a parasol or a small beach tent where the dog can relax during the hottest hours of the day.

Before you leave

Make sure you leave nothing behind, and clean up after yourself and your dog!

If there are taps or beach showers where you are, you might want to rinse your dog before you leave for the day. Salt can cause irritation to the dog’s skin, and sand can get in their eyes as they’re trying to get rid of it from their faces, which can cause eye infections and lots of discomfort. The dog will probably also have been exposed to plenty of dirt and bacteria during all the exploring.

If you can’t find any fresh water at the beach, it might be a good idea to scrub your dog with a towel before you get in the car (maybe mainly to not end up with a desert in the boot), and then give him or her a quick bath when you get home.

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Win 1 of 12 LOVE Packs

valentine's day competition (more…)

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Do Plastic Chicken Houses get hot?

hot weatherI get asked this question A LOT, and the answer is yes plastic chicken houses do get hot in the heat, but so do wooden ones.  Just because a chook house is made from plastic it doesn’t mean that it will heat up more and boil your chooks.

With the Omlet Eglu houses they are double insulated, which means that they keep the inside of the house cooler in summer and warmer in winter.  Now to clarify the double insulation in summer does not mean that your chickens will be living in a fridge!  It is probably around 5 -10 degrees cooler in the house versa outside depending on where the house is situated. (more…)

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