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Category Archives: Pet Facts

Does your cat affect your sleep?

More than 80% of cat owners are having their sleep disturbed by their feline friends, reveals latest Omlet survey.

Following a discussion amongst the Omlet cat owners about the close sleeping arrangements with our pets, and the resulting impact on our daytime energy levels, we began wondering whether it is actually normal, or wise, to be allowing our cats to sleep in our beds?

Are we just soft when it comes to letting our cats get cosy at night, or are we a nation of pet slaves who value our cats happiness more than our own sleep?

To find out we decided to conduct a survey to shed light on the sleeping patterns of cats and how their nocturnal habits affect their owners. Over 900 cat owners responded and more than half (56%) said they let their cat sleep on the bed with them at night, with 40% allowing them to do so on the first day! In fact by the end of the first month of cat ownership the number has increased to 71% of owners allowing their cats into their bed at night.

A massive 84% of cat owners who allow their cat to sleep in their bedroom admitted to having their sleep disturbed by their cat – and as a result 1 in 5 cat owners sometimes resent their cat following a bad night’s sleep. Could this cosy sleeping arrangement actually be negatively impacting the nations’ relationship with their cats?

We invited these cat owners to share how exactly their cat disturbs their sleep. Many agreed that the main disturbance is due to their cats lying too close to them, purring, snoring or cleaning themselves. However, here are our top 10 favourite, more unusual, ways that cats are disturbing their owners sleep…

  1. Chasing mice around the bedroom
  2. Patting my face
  3. Trying to eat my toes
  4. Zoomies at 3am
  5. Dribbling on me
  6. Hairballs
  7. Trying to wake me up for breakfast, or asking for a snack
  8. Knocking things off shelves
  9. Licking my eyelid
  10. Restless dreams

A third of cat owners say they have to change their bed sheets more regularly since allowing their furry friend to sleep on their bed. Only a small number of people (12.2%) are aware that allowing cats to sleep in their bed is unhygienic.

Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine found that when you look a bit closer cats can have parasites like fleas and ringworm, which unless treated can cause health issues in humans.  Fleas for example can jump into your mouth leading to owners becoming inadvertently infected by tapeworms. Yuck.

37% of cat owners have made the wise choice to shut their bedroom door at night, saying they can’t allow their cat to sleep on the bed because their sleep gets disturbed.

1 in 4 owners wish their cat would sleep in their own bed at night – which begs the question, why don’t they?

Perhaps they’re so connected to their owner that they can’t bear to be more than 2 inches away from them, or maybe their owner has never found a cat bed which provides the same level of luxurious comfort as a king size bed and a thick, cosy duvet does?

The Maya Nook gives your cat their own little space, complete with a cosy bed, curtains and wardrobe, to create a warm, secluded and calming zone for them to sleep in complete peace, undisturbed by you and most importantly out of mischief.

Designed to look like a piece of modern furniture, the Nook looks great in any room so can be placed in your bedroom if your cat likes to be close to you, or downstairs to give you a truly undisturbed sleep while your cat enjoys a luxurious slumber in their very own cat house.

Overall 52% of cat owners said they may prefer it if their cat slept in their own bed, yet 70% of people say they don’t regret allowing their cat to sleep on their bed. So the Maya Nook might be the purrfect compromise to keep both cats and their owners happy.

Sources –
https://www.vet.cornell.edu/departments-centers-and-institutes/cornell-feline-health-center/health-information/feline-health-topics/zoonotic-disease-what-can-i-catch-my-cat

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This entry was posted in Cats


Pooch vs Partner: Who won your heart this Valentine’s Day?

For Valentine’s Day we wanted to find out how much love you have for your four legged friends vs the affection you have for your partner? We surveyed over 400 dog owners. The results are in and they make an interesting, yet not surprising read!

Among the key findings includes:

78% expressed that their dog is more attentive than their partner!

75% said their dog brings out their best side more than their partner does!

Check out the infographic below to see all the results!

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This entry was posted in Dogs


Does my pet need a buddy?

An animal that exhibits a high degree of sociality is called a social animal. This means they need contact with their own kind. Being kept on their own causes these animals to experience boredom, frustration and fear. Unless you have plenty of time to socialise with them, it is recommended these pets have a buddy.

Solitary animals on the other hand spend a majority of their lives without others of their species, with possible exceptions for mating and raising their young. They are often territorial and do not like the company of another animal, especially an animal of their own kind. Some solitary animals will even start fighting when kept together, which can harm or even kill one or both animals.

 

Rabbits
Wild rabbits spend their lives as part of a large group, known as a warren. Rabbits are very sociable animals and need to be kept with at least one other rabbit. It is easiest if rabbits are kept together from birth, but rabbits less than 3 months old will usually live together happily. The best combination is a neutered male and a neutered female. Two litter brothers or two litter sisters will also get on well, but to prevent fighting it is important that they are both neutered.

Guinea pigs
In the wild guinea pigs live in groups of 10 or more, they are social creatures, and like company. As pets they are usually kept in pairs; two females (sows) will live happily together, as will two males (boars), particularly if they are brothers. Two boars of different ages will usually live together, as long as there are no females around. If a female and male live together the male should be castrated.

Dogs
Dogs love nothing more than attention and affection, whether it be from you (their owner) or their fellow dog friends. They can be perfectly happy with just the attention from their owner and family, which means getting another dog is not essential. It is often thought that adopting another dog will instantly solve all problems associated with your first dog’s separation anxiety, but unfortunately this isn’t always the case. When adopting a second dog you must consider a number of different variables, including gender, temperament, energy requirements and size.

Cats
It is thought that cats don’t actually crave companionship from one of their own. Often they are perfectly happy being the only cat in the house. Cats are indeed a solitary species but they can and do live in groups. But an extra cat friend (or partner in crime) does provides extra mental and physical stimulation. The major benefit to getting two cats is that they will keep each other company whilst you are away. Getting kittens from the same litter of cats is always the best choice.

Chickens
Free-ranging chickens are social animals. Hens and chicks are the core, while roosters live independently. Because they are social animals they prefer to live in a flock. A chicken without a buddy will get lonely and stressed out. When you have a group of chickens or add new chickens to your existing flock, they will have to establish the pecking order and you might start to wonder if they are social animals after all. Read the guide on our website for more information on how to introduce chickens to an existing flock.

 

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This entry was posted in Pet Advice


Healthy Bulldogs and the Danish Bulldog Club Show

In August the Danish Bulldog Club hosted a bulldog show in Denmark, where Omlet sponsored prizes for the ‘Most Beautiful Head’ category! We had a chat with the organisers to learn a bit more about the bulldog and find out why they focus so much on promoting the healthy bulldog.

    

Why is there a focus on promoting health in bulldogs at this show?

We focus on promoting bulldog health at all our shows and the reason why we have so much focus precisely on health is that many bulldogs (many different varieties) unfortunately have become more and more at risk of illness.

We believe it’s important to show the healthy dog that can breathe, move freely, is not bothered by allergies etc.

What are the signs of a healthy bulldog? And what are the most common health problems in bulldogs?

A healthy bulldog can move around freely. Meaning it is not physically limited. Open nostrils that do not create breathing problems, and it’s important that they are not overweight since this can put pressure on their hips etc.
The most common health problems are skin problems, hip/elbow dysplasia, breathing problems/narrow nostrils.

For those interested in getting a bulldog, what can they do to ensure they buy a healthy one? And how can you help your bulldog stay healthy if you already have one?

When buying a bulldog, the best way you can make sure it’s healthy is by seeing documentation for the parents such as x-rays of the hips, elbows, back etc. If possible, it is best to met both parents, but at least you need to see the mother.
Likewise, it’s important that you familiarise yourself with the breed and for instance go to a show where you can see and meet different dogs and breeders.
When you have your bulldog, the best thing you can do is to keep it slender/muscular and in good shape. Make sure it gets the right amount of exercise, food and lots of love. Remember that the bulldog is not just a sofadog. A bulldog needs exercise and stimulation just like other breeds.

What is the best thing about bulldogs compared to other dog breeds?

The bulldog is a very versatile breed which is suitable for everything from family dog to a hardworking training buddy.
The dogs enormous personality makes it a fun and loving member of the family and its muscular body og strong determination makes it the ultimate training partner for everything from obedience to weightpull.
Generally, the bulldog easily adapts to the individual family’s needs.

    

How many different varieties of bulldog are there and do you host shows for all of them in DBC?

There are: English Bulldog, French Bulldog, Old English Bulldog, Leavitt Bulldog, Renascence Bulldog, Continental Bulldog, American Bulldog etc.

However, in Denmark the American Bulldog is illegal.

So far, we only host shows for the OEB and Leavitt Bulldogs.

What might people not know about bulldogs?

They are super charming and very stubborn but they bring out smiles and laughs every single day.

 


***Winners of the ‘Most Beautiful Head’ category – sponsored by Omlet***

    

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This entry was posted in Events


Fascinating Rabbit Facts

1)

Rabbit teeth never stop growing and it is very important to keep a regular check on them. Rabbits have 28 teeth. Some signs of overgrown teeth are lack of appetite, listlessness and weight loss. Always seek expert advice about this.

2)

Rabbits live for between 4 – 8 years. Giant Rabbits generally live shorter lives – approx 4 -5 years. Dwarf breeds have a longer life span and can live for as long as eight years and in some rare cases, it has been documented, for even longer. 

3)

Rabbits’ eyes are on the sides of the head, giving them excellent vision all the way around, with a small blind spot at the point directly in front of them and directly behind them. As prey animals, this trait enables them to keep a lookout for predators.

4)

Rabbits cannot sweat. They release heat over their body surface, especially the ears.

5)

Rabbits have 5 toes on each front paw and 4 toes on each hind paw, so 18 total.

6)

A Rabbit’s pregnancy lasts 28-31 days and an average litter has 6-10 babies.

7)
A female Rabbit is called a doe
A male Rabbit is called a buck.
A young Rabbit is called a kit (or kitten)
8)
Baby Rabbits are born with their eyes closed, and the eyes do not begin to open until around the age of two weeks old.
9)

More than half of the world’s rabbits live in North America.

10)

Rabbits are crepuscular which means they snooze all day and are most active in the early morning and in the evening.

11)

When a rabbit is very happy, it jumps up into the air, twisting and flicking its feet and head. This movement is known as a binky!

12)

Rabbits chew 120 times a minute and have over 17,000 taste buds.

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This entry was posted in Pet Facts